ANTH211 - Cultural Anthropology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Uses evidence from peoples and cultures around the world to introduce concepts of culture and society, language and its influence on perception of cultural reality, anthropological theory and research methods, and kinship, religious, and social organization. The diverse ways in which humans have organized to meet the contingencies of daily life provide a deeper understanding and respect for the different patterns of culture humans have created. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

ANTH220 - Ritual, Myth, and World View: Anthropological Approaches to Religion
Credit: 3 semester hours

A cross-cultural examination of classic and modern theories of religion with an emphasis on non-industrial societies. The course surveys all aspects of religion, including shamanism, drug use, witchcraft, possession, and healing, and uses cross-cultural evidence to comprehend why people invoke myth and enact ritual as a means for understanding their world. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

ANTH300 - Topics in Anthropology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements. The topics course will rotate various subjects including:

Native North Americans
Uses ethnographies specific to native North Americans to examine their prehistory, history, and culture. Types of social organization, kinship norms, religions, subsistence patterns, and culture contact through colonization are examined.

European Ethnology: Ireland
Uses ethnographies specific to European and Irish peoples to examine their prehistory, history, and culture. Types of social organization, kinship norms, religions, subsistence patterns, and culture contact through colonization are examined.

Latin America and Amazonia
Uses ethnographies specific to the people of Latin America and Amazonia to examine their prehistory, history, and culture. Types of social organization, kinship norms, religions, subsistence patterns, and culture contact through colonization are examined.


ANTH305 - The War on Drugs
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course explores how, since the mid-1980s, the so-called "war on drugs" has helped to fundamentally reshape America in ways we have yet to understand or even acknowledge. The central question of the course is: what are the cultural forces at work that allow us to explain how the repressive policies and practices of the drug war can exist in an ostensibly free society? To engage with this question, the course explores topics such as race, racism, American mythology, capitalism, the history of drug policy, and the globalization of the drug war. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

ANTH315 - Race & Racism in American Culture
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course analyzes recent developments in research related to race and racism that has revealed that racism is capable of remaining socially effective even when individuals themselves do not hold racist beliefs. The stumbling block that efforts to mitigate racism must now confront is a "racism without racists." By investigating this dynamic, we seek to shed new light on why race and racism have been absolutely central to the genesis, development, and modern-day form of American society, politics, and culture. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

ANTH490 - Independent Study
Credit: 1-6 semester hours

Under faculty direction, students engage in directed readings and tutorials that lead to the production of a major research project that involves analysis of primary and secondary works. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ECON281 - Microeconomics
Credit: 3 semester hours

Describes how households and firms seek to maximize wealth as they produce, purchase and sell scarce goods and resources in a free-market society. Examines the unintended harmful consequences of free-market operations and the methods societies use to moderate and control these consequences. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

ECON282 - Macroeconomics
Credit: 3 semester hours

Describes how national and international economies function from the perspective of the citizen policymaker. Studies how national wealth is produced, how economies grow or fail to grow, how national economic activity is measured, and how policy makers use tax, budgetary and money supply policies to encourage good things (like growth, stability and full employment) and to discourage bad things (like poverty, unemployment, and rapid inflation). This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST103 - The World to 1750
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces students to global history before the industrial revolution, with particular emphasis on non-Western civilizations. The course uses various cross-cultural perspectives to examine major historical themes such as the rise of civilizations, the impact of universal religions, and global interaction. A principal goal of the course is to encourage students to think about history in comparative historical perspective. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST104 - The World Since 1750
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces students to modern global history since the eighteenth century. Its focus is on the interaction between what has traditionally been called the "Western" world and the "non-Western" world. The course explores general topics and themes such as imperialism, nationalism, and modernization by looking at specific historical episodes. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST221 - United States through the Civil War
Credit: 3 semester hours

Surveys colonial, revolutionary, early national, and Civil War America. Beginning with the encounter between Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans in the New World, this course focuses on the country's multinational heritage and the experiences of ordinary Americans. Special attention is given to the consequences of geographical and economic expansion, the paradox of slavery and freedom, and the meanings of citizenship. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST222 - United States Since Reconstruction
Credit: 3 semester hours

Surveys United States history from the Civil War to the present. Particular attention will be given to the diversity of the population and the experiences of ordinary people. Themes include isolationism and interventionism, the changing role of government in people's lives, movements for social justice, and tensions between modern and traditional cultures. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST275 - Religion in America
Credit: 3 semester hours

Provides a historical overview of religion in the United States, with particular emphasis on its diversity and its role in shaping the American character. (See also RS 475/575). This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST281 - History of Women and Gender in the United States
Credit: 3 semester hours

Through primary and secondary readings and research, we will explore the history of women in this country from the colonial period through the 1980s with a focus on women's activism and cultural expectations for women. Themes include race and gender identities, the construction of separate spheres, the struggle for suffrage and equality, sexuality, and feminism. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST282 - The American Presidency
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course provides a broad overview of the ever-expanding office and powers of the presidency in the American political system. Attention is also given to the presidents as individuals and as head of the First Family. This course will also explore how the American Presidency impacts global events and politics. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST377 - The United States Civil War and Reconstruction
Credit: 3 semester hours

Examines the ideologies, social institutions, reform movements, prejudices, and political, economic, and geographic transformations that caused the collapse of the nation in 1861. The Civil War, as well as the process of emancipation and reconstruction, will also be considered. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST378 - The United States in the Twentieth Century
Credit: 3 semester hours

Explores the emergence of the United States as a global power and the simultaneous social and cultural transformations. Areas of particular concern will include race relations, gender roles, superpower status, protest movements, popular culture, political upheaval, and the changing role of government. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST383 - African American History I
Credit: 3 semester hours

Provides students with a comprehensive survey of the role that African Americans have played in shaping American history. This course will explore the major forces, movements, and personalities that shaped African American history and culture from the African past through Reconstruction. Furthermore, this course will aid students in developing a sense of the African American experience in the United States by examining slavery and the abolitionist movement, African American religious developments, major African American leaders and organizations, and the role African Americans played in American politics, economics, the military, and cultural development. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST384 - African American History II
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course will examine African American history from emancipation and reconstruction to the post black power movement. It will provide a comprehensive examination of the role that African Americans have had in shaping America as we know it today. The course will study and analyze African Americans' reaction to freedom and reconstruction, the onset of Jim Crow, and the continuing struggle by African Americans and their supporters to obtain social, economic, and political equality. The course will aid students to develop a sense of the African American experience in the United States by examining major African American leaders, organizations, sports figures, and cultural personalities. Furthermore, students will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by civil rights and black power participants by reading the first-hand accounts of individuals active in these movements. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST385 - Special Topics
Credit: 3 semester hours

These courses cover a variety of new themes in historical inquiry and are offered on an occasional basis. May be repeated provided subject matter is different. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

HIST490 - Independent Study
Credit: 1-6 semester hours

Under faculty direction, students engage in directed readings and tutorials that lead to the production of a major research paper that involves analysis of primary and secondary works. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

POLS223 - American Federal Government
Credit: 3 semester hours

An introduction to the basic principles and processes of American national government, including federalism, representation, separation of powers, checks and balances, the committee system, the electoral college, political parties, and judicial review. Emphasis is placed on understanding the Constitution and the intention of the framers, although modern developments and contemporary policy issues are not neglected. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

PSY103 - Psychological Systems
Credit: 3 semester hours

Serves as an introduction to those systems of thought and selected bodies of data concerned with human behavioral systems. This level of system is seen as interfacing on the upper end of complexity with social systems and on the lower end of complexity with biological systems. Selected areas of study include scientific methodology, evolutionary bases of human behavior, sensation and perception, affect and motivation, learning and memory, intelligence and problem solving, personality and abnormal behavior. THIS COURSE IS A PREREQUISITE FOR ALL OTHER PSYCHOLOGY COURSES. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

PSY202 - Life Span Development
Credit: 3 semester hours

A general review of the theory and research relating to the development of human behavior and cognition. It covers areas from prenatal to old age and death. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY204 - Experimental Procedures
Credit: 3 semester hours

An introduction to the methodology employed by psychologists in the investigation of human and non-human behavior. The course includes a treatment of philosophy of science, measurement, research design, data analysis, APA format, and ethical considerations. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY303 - Child and Adolescent Development
Credit: 3 semester hours

Studies the processes and events that contribute to development in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Relevant theory and research are considered. Classroom activities are supplemented with field-based observations. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY305 - General Psychology for the Health Sciences
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course provides a broad overview of scientific psychology and focuses on the scientific study of individual and collective behavior, the physical and environmental bases of behavior, and the analysis and treatment of behavior problems and disorders. The course is designed specifically to explore the specific MCAT content areas of behavioral science for individuals interested in pursuing graduate or professional studies. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY321 - Environmental Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Depletion, littering, and natural resource depletion. A special emphasis will be placed on findings from scientific psychology, and the role that psychological knowledge can play in the encouragement of more ecologically sound human behavior. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY325 - Introduction to Evolutionary Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course covers the basic information regarding biological evolution, as well as the following topics as are relevant to the impact of evolution on human behavior: natural and sexual selection, mate choice, reproductive and mating strategies, sociality and attachment, altruism, aggression, brain evolution and cognitive abilities, language, emotion and motivation, psychopathology and the relationship between biological evolutionary processes and cultural dynamics and processes. This course is recommended for third and fourth year undergraduate students. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103 Strongly recommended: BIO107 or BIO114

PSY330 - Human Sexuality
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course studies the basic theories and principles of sexuality: cognitive, emotional, social, and moral. A developmental approach is followed, beginning with conception and progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and late life. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY333 - Mindfulness-Based Practices: Applications for Mental and Physical Health Care Providers and Educators
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course introduces students to the practice of mindfulness meditation, the research and science behind mindfulness, and the evidence-based uses of mindfulness in mental healthcare, physical healthcare and education. The development of mindfulness, both for self-care and as a clinical skill, requires intense training, practice and supervision. This course will thus require a substantial time commitment and a willingness to practice mindfulness exercises at least 45 minutes daily, outside of regular class time, during most of the duration of the session. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY335 - Child Psychopathology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of mental health illnesses that affect children and, by extension, their families. The course has a strong critical thinking focus to push students to understand the impact of family and society on childhood psychopathology, cross-cultural issues, and the challenges of working with these children in schools and other settings. The course is geared towards students who will eventually be psychologists, mental health counselors, social workers, pediatric nurses, and teachers, but anyone who works with children, has children of their own, or plans to have children someday will benefit from taking this course. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY 303 is strongly recommended, but not required.

PSY350 - The Psychology of Religion
Credit: 3 semester hours

The goals of this class are to (1) learn about the basic concepts of the study of religion from a psychological perspective; (2) learn many specifics about what psychological researchers have learned about religion; (3) develop skills in thinking critically about the concepts and findings; and (4) develop skills in writing and speaking about thoughts on these topics and issues. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103 This course is cross-listed with RS 350.

PSY355 - Adult Development
Credit: 3 semester hours

Studies the factors and variables contributing to change throughout adulthood with an emphasis on current research and theory. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY359 - The Psychology of Learning and Cognition
Credit: 3 semester hours

Studies the adaptive nature of learning and cognition. The course involves a survey of classic research on basic learning principles, such as reinforcement, extinction, punishment, and stimulus control. In addition, traditional research and theory in memory and information processing will be interpreted. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY360 - Special Topics in Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY380 - Community Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

The content of the course includes both a) specific information about concepts employed by community psychologists and the research findings that relate to those concepts, and b) the approach community psychologists take, which includes ways of conceptualizing causes, current conditions, and potential treatments for mental distress and mental disorders. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY395 - Cross-Cultural Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces several models of multicultural psychology. It seeks to increase cultural sensitivity and cross-cultural communication skills. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY420 - Applied Behavior Analysis
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces the application of basic behavior principles to human behavior of clinical or social significance. Fundamental processes of reinforcement, punishment, extinction, and stimulus control will be discussed as they relate to the following phenomena or settings: behavior disorders (e.g., phobias, depression, autism); institutional token economies; education (both classroom management and curriculum development); industrial settings; and issues of social importance, including conservation, crime, and delinquency. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY421 - Addiction Screening, Assessment, and Treatment Planning
Credit: 1 semester hour

Learners will gain skills in screening and assessing for substance abuse in a variety of settings using various tools. Further, students will be able to use findings from clinical assessments to develop treatment plans for clients dealing with addictions. This course provides training for the core addiction counseling functions of screening, assessment, and treatment planning.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY422 - Motivational Interviewing for Addiction Treatment
Credit: 1 semester hour

Motivational interviewing, along with cognitive behavioral therapy and 12-step facilitation has been identified by National Institutes of Health as an intervention with a significant evidence base. Motivational interviewing is especially notable in its application as a brief intervention used flexibly in many settings. In this course students will be introduced to the transtheoretical model of change, the supporting theory for motivational interviewing. Learners will develop advanced skills in using motivational interviewing in working with people dealing with chemical and behavioral addictions. This course provides training for the core function of counseling.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY423 - Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Addiction Treatment
Credit: 1 semester hour

Cognitive behavioral therapy, along with motivational interviewing and 12-step facilitation has been identified by National Institutes of Health as an intervention with a significant evidence base. In this course students will develop advanced skills in providing cognitive behavioral interventions with people dealing with chemical and behavioral addictions. Students will consider the use of cognitive behavioral therapies with a variety of client groups. This course provides training for the core function of counseling.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY424 - Twelve-Step Facilitation and Mutual-Help Groups in Addiction Treatment
Credit: 1 semester hour

Twelve-step facilitation, along with motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy has been identified by National Institutes of Health as an intervention with a significant evidence base. This approach is especially notable in its effectiveness in producing abstinence as opposed to drug and alcohol use reduction. Students will develop beginning skills in providing Twelve-Step Facilitation and be able to differentiate this practice from clients’ participation in Twelve-Step groups. In this course students will be introduced to a variety of mutual help groups, including Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, Women for Sobriety, and Rational Recovery. Finally, students will consider the utility of mutual help groups as adjuncts to addiction treatment of all types. This course provides training for the core functions of referral and counseling.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY430 - Exploring Issues in Forensic Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course provides an introductory look at various aspects involved in the broad field of Forensic Psychology. It will examine topics in the correctional, policing, law enforcement and court environments. These topics will be further broken down into issues relating to adults, juveniles, family and civil matters. This course is recommended for third and fourth year undergraduate students. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY450 - Contemporary Clinical Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Studies the science and profession of clinical psychology, including its history, training, methods, and community applications. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY457 - Theories of Personality
Credit: 3 semester hours

Provides a survey of the major modern Western views of personality, personality development, personality pathology, and derivative approaches to psychotherapy. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

PSY458 - Abnormal Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Offers an in-depth study of the definitions, classifications, processes, and events that comprise abnormal behavior. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY464 - History and Systems of Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Covering the period beginning in the late 19th century, when psychology became an independent discipline, this course recounts the history of psychology in terms of people, ideas, and schools of thought. The course strives to personalize the history of psychology by showing how major events in those theorists' lives have affected their ideas, approaches, and methods. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY465 - Social Psychology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Considers the social nature of man, the socialization process and the individual in the group. Emphasis upon potential origins of social cognition, including person perception, stereotypes, and attribution, as well as social influence phenomena, including social facilitation, conformity and obedience to authority. Attention will also be given to application of social psychological principles to natural settings, including clinical, educational, and industrial environments. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

PSY471 - Fundamentals of Counseling
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces effective helping through the counseling process. This course will include historical development, the role and function of counseling, the counseling relationship, theoretical foundations, and ethical considerations. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisites: PSY103

SOC101 - Introduction to Sociology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Covers core topics of an introductory sociology course. Students will leave the course with a broad, multicultural, historical framework for making sense out of their world, and an appreciation of the role of sociology in promoting an intelligent worldview. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SOC200 - Urban Sociology
Credit: 3 semester hours

This course gives the student an opportunity to integrate a sociological frame-of-reference with an analysis of urban area problems. Issues are examined not only from the viewpoint of the sociologist but from other disciplines and perspectives. A broad spectrum of what is occurring in a rapidly urbanizing world is presented, especially as related to neighborhoods, communities, cities, suburbs, and social issues. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SOC300 - Special Topics in Sociology
Credit: 3 semester hours

Focuses on a particular topic in sociological inquiry. May be repeated provided subject matter is different. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SOC301 - Community Sociology
Credit: 3 semester hours

A study of the theories of community and community organization, methods of community study, and problems of rural and urban areas in the United States. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SOC360 - Sociology of Aging
Credit: 3 semester hours

An overview of social gerontology, the scientific discipline devoted to the study of the nonphysical aspects of human aging, such as demographic, historical, psychological, and social aspects. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SOC490 - Independent Study
Credit: 1-6 semester hours

Under faculty direction, students engage in directed readings and tutorials that lead to the production of a major research project that involves analysis of primary and secondary works. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.
Prerequisite: permission from the instructor

SS101 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Practice
Credit: 3 semester hours

Introduces students to critical thinking and humanistic methodologies of inquiry and communication. This course takes the idea of "critical thinking" beyond the workplace notion of problem solving to introduce students to the exercise of careful, informed, deliberate thought, with the goal of learning to critique accepted thought and action. Entails reading of critical thinkers, past and present, from disparate disciplines. Taught on a rotating basis by all members of the social sciences and humanities faculty. Open to students in other majors as well, this course may count as a general social science elective within the University Studies program. Course is cross-listed with HUM101. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.

SS305 - Political and Economic Power
Credit: 3 semester hours

This interdisciplinary course studies the economic and political forces which drive and control societal development worldwide. This course can be used to satisfy University Studies requirements.